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The Dirty War
Author: Martin Dillon
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136754059
Pages: 448
Year: 2016-05-06
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First published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Dirty Secrets, Dirty War
Author: David Cox
Publisher: EveningPostBooks
ISBN: 0981873502
Pages: 232
Year: 2008
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From 1976-1983, an estimated 30,000 people disappeared in Argentina. They were victims of the “Dirty War” – a brutal campaign designed by the government to root out possible subversives. Those suspected of being dissidents were kidnapped and taken to secret detention centers. Most were tortured and then killed – never seen again.Robert J. Cox, editor of the Buenos Aires Herald, did what few others were willing to do – he told the truth about what was happening. Every day his newspaper reported on the kidnappings and killings. He challenged those in power – asking questions and demanding answers. Cox's commitment to reporting the truth made him a hero to the families of the disappeared, but an enemy of the state.This is the remarkable story of one man's courage in the face of adversity. It is the story of a man dedicated to protecting the freedom of the press and to protecting his family. It is the story of those who disappeared and the man who stayed in order to tell their stories.Cox's story is told by his son David who grew up under the pall of terrorism, but was inspired by his father's “great courage to write what was true.” He has written the book that his father could not.
Argentina's Missing Bones
Author: James P. Brennan
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520297911
Pages: 208
Year: 2018-03-30
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"Argentina's missing bones: revisiting the history of the dirty war examines the history of state terrorism during Argentina's 1976-83 military dictatorship in a single place: the industrial city of Caordoba, Argentina's second largest city and the site of some of the dirty war's greatest crimes. It examines the city's previous history of social protest, working-class militancy, and leftist activism as an explanation for the particular nature of the dirty war there. Argentina's missing bones examines both national and transnational influences on the counter-revolutionary war in Caordoba. The book also considers the legacy of this period and examines the role of the state in constructing a public memory of the violence and holding those responsible accountable through the most extensive trials for crimes against humanity to take place anywhere in Latin America"--Provided by publisher.
The Ideological Origins of the Dirty War
Author: Associate Professor of History and Director of the Janey Program in Latin American Studies Federico Finchelstein, Federico Finchelstein
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190611766
Pages: 232
Year: 2017-01-06
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Argentina is famous for its ties with fascism as well as its welcoming of Nazi war criminals after World War II. At mid-century, it was the home of Peronism. It was also the birthplace of the Dirty War and one of Latin America's most criminal dictatorships in the 1970s and early 1980s. How and why did all of these regimes emerge in a country that was "born liberal"? Why did these authoritarian traits first emerge in Argentina under the shadow of fascism? In this book, Federico Finchelstein tells the history of modern Argentina as seen from the perspective of political violence and ideology. He focuses on the theory and practice of the fascist idea in Argentine political culture throughout the twentieth century, analyzing the connections between fascist theory and the Holocaust, antisemitism, and the military junta's practices of torture and state violence, with its networks of concentration camps and extermination. The book demonstrates how the state's war against its citizens was rooted in fascist ideology, explaining the Argentine variant of fascism, formed by nacionalistas, and its links with European fascism and Catholicism. It particularly emphasizes the genocidal dimensions of the persecution of Argentine Jewish victims. The destruction of the rule of law and military state terror during the Dirty War, Finchelstein shows, was the product of many political and ideological reformulations and personifications of fascism. The Ideological Origins of the Dirty War provides a genealogy of state-sanctioned terror, revealing fascism as central to Argentina's political culture and its violent twentieth century.
Histories of the Hanged: The Dirty War in Kenya and the End of Empire
Author: David Anderson
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393079740
Pages: 448
Year: 2011-02-07
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"A remarkable account of Britain's last stand in Kenya. This is imperial history at its very best."--John Hope Franklin In "a gripping narrative that is all but impossible to put down" (Joseph C. Miller), Histories of the Hanged exposes the long-hidden colonial crimes of the British in Kenya. This groundbreaking work tells how the brutal war between the colonial government and the insurrectionist Mau Mau between 1952 and 1960 dominated the final bloody decade of imperialism in East Africa. Using extraordinary new evidence, David Anderson puts the colonial government on trial with eyewitness testimony from over 800 court cases and previously unseen archives. His research exonerates the Kikuyu rebels; hardly the terrorists they were thought to be; and reveals the British to be brutal aggressors in a "dirty war" that involved leaders at the highest ranks of the British government. This astonishing piece of scholarship portrays a teetering colonial empire in its final phase; employing whatever military and propaganda methods it could to preserve an order that could no longer hold.
The Catholic Church and Argentina's Dirty War
Author: Gustavo Morello
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 019023427X
Pages: 240
Year: 2015
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Drawing on interviews with victims of forced disappearance, documents from the state and the Church, as well as field work and participant observation, The Catholic Church and Argentina's Dirty War explores how the Argentine government deployed the legitimating discourse of Catholicism to justify terrorism in the case of La Salette missionaries. It examines how the official Catholic hierarchy rationalized their silence, and how the victims understood their Catholic faith in such a context --
A Dirty War
Author: Anna Politkovskaya
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 1407018280
Pages: 368
Year: 2009-05-04
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The Chechen War was supposed to be over in 1996 after the first Yeltsin campaign, but in the summer of 1999, the new Putin government decided, in their own words, to 'do the job properly'. Before all the bodies of those who had died in the first campaign had been located or identified, many more thousands would be slaughtered in another round of fighting. The first account to be written by a Russian woman, A Dirty War is an edgy and intense study of a conflict that shows no sign of being resolved. Exasperated by the Russian government's attempt to manipulate media coverage of the war, journalist Anna Politkovskaya undertook to go to Chechnya, to make regular reports and keep events in the public eye. In a series of despatches from July 1999 to January 2001 she vividly describes the atrocities and abuses of war, whether it be the corruption endemic in post-Communist Russia, in particular the government and the military, or the spurious arguments and abominable behaviour of the Chechen authorities. In these courageous reports, Politkovskaya excoriates male stupidity and brutality on both sides of the conflict and interviews the civilians whose homes and communities have been laid waste, leaving them nowhere to live, and nothing and no one to believe in.
Guerrillas and Generals
Author: Paul H. Lewis
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 0275973603
Pages: 263
Year: 2002
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A comprehensive and balanced examination of the Dirty War in Argentina.
The Dirty War on Syria
Author: Tim Anderson
Publisher:
ISBN: 0973714778
Pages:
Year: 2016
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Argentina's "Dirty War"
Author: Donald C. Hodges
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292776896
Pages: 407
Year: 2014-01-30
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Argentines ask how their ultracivilized country, reputedly the most European in Latin America, could have relapsed into near-barbarism in the 1970s. This enlightening study seeks to answer that question by reviewing the underlying political events and intellectual foundations of the "dirty war" (1975–1978) and overlapping Military Process (1976–1982). It examines the ideologies and actions of the main protagonists—the armed forces, guerrillas, and organized labor—over time and traces them to their roots. In the most comprehensive treatment of the subject to date, Hodges examines primary materials never seen by other researchers, including clandestinely published guerrilla documents, and interviews important actors in Argentina's political drama. His wide-ranging scholarship traces the origins of the national security and national salvation doctrines to the Spanish Inquisition, sixteenth-century witch hunts, and nineteenth-century reactions to the modernizing ideologies of liberalism, democracy, socialism, and communism. Hodges posits that the "dirty war," Military Process, and revolutionary war to which they responded represented the culmination of social tensions that arose in 1930 with the launching of the Military Era by Argentina's first successful twentieth-century coup. He offers the disquieting hypothesis that as long as the "Argentine Question" remains unsettled the military may intervene again, the resistance movement will remain strong, and violence may continue even under a democratic government.
Behind the Disappearances
Author: Iain Guest
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812213130
Pages: 605
Year: 1990-10
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2. The War Begins
"Dossier Secreto"
Author: Martin E. Andersen
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 412
Year: 1993
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A Dirty War in West Africa
Author: Lansana Gberie
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0253218551
Pages: 224
Year: 2005
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"Provides important insider information concerning Sierra Leone's recent war... and builds on [the author's] established reputation as an insightful and courageous journalist." --William Reno, Northwestern University A Dirty War in West Africa recounts Lansana Gberie's harrowing experiences as a journalist during the decade-long civil war in Sierra Leone. Since 1991, this West African nation has been brought to its knees by a series of coups, violent conflicts, and finally, outright war. The war has ended today, but it is clear that things are hardly settled. Focusing on the group spearheading the violence, the Revolutionary United Front (RUF), Gberie exposes the corruption and appalling use of rape and mutilation as tactics to overthrow the former government. Gberie looks closely at the rise of the RUF and its ruthless leader, Foday Sankoh, as he seeks to understand the personalities and parties involved in the war. This sobering and powerful account reveals the domestic and international consequences of the Sierra Leone conflict.
Departing at Dawn
Author: Gloria Lisé
Publisher: The Feminist Press at CUNY
ISBN: 1558616470
Pages: 160
Year: 2009-05-01
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A young woman flees Argentina's Dirty War but cannot leave her past behind.
Disappearing Acts
Author: Diana Taylor
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822318687
Pages: 309
Year: 1997
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In Disappearing Acts, Diana Taylor looks at how national identity is shaped, gendered, and contested through spectacle and spectatorship. The specific identity in question is that of Argentina, and Taylor's focus is directed toward the years 1976 to 1983 in which the Argentine armed forces were pitted against the Argentine people in that nation's 'Dirty War'. Combining feminism, cultural studies, and performance theory, Taylor analyses the political spectacles that comprised the war - concentration camps, torture, 'disappearances' - as well as the rise of theatrical productions, demonstrations, and other performative practices that attempted to resist and subvert the Argentine military. Taylor uses performance theory to explore how public spectacle both builds and dismantles a sense of national and gender identity. Here, nation is understood as a product of communal 'imaginings' that are rehearsed, written, and staged - and spectacle is the desiring machine at work in those imaginings. Taylor argues that the founding scenario of Argentineness stages the struggle for national identity as a battle between men - fought on, over, and through the feminine body of the Motherland. She shows how the military's representations of itself as the model of national authenticity established the parameters of the conflict in the 70s and 80s, feminised the enemy, and positioned the public - limiting its ability to respond. Those who challenged the dictatorship, from the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo to progressive theater practitioners, found themselves in what Taylor describes as 'bad scripts.' This telling analysis of the aesthetics of violence and the disappearance of civil society during Argentina's spectacle of terror will interest students and scholars - including sociologists, anthropologists, political scientists, psychologists, and feminist, postcolonial, and literary critics - concerned with issues of power and the interrelations of gender and nationhood.