Thank You God For Leading Me Home My Journey From Koenigsberg To America Before During And After World War Ii Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

Thank You God, for Leading Me Home: My Journey from Königsberg to America Before, During, and After World War II
Author: Charlotte Werth, Tatum Jennings
Publisher: Lulu Press, Inc
ISBN: 1483452689
Pages:
Year: 2016-09-28
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Charlotte Werth was born Dec. 21, 1927, in Königsberg, Germany, in what was then known as East Prussia. In this memoir, she recalls the happy times of her childhood before the Nazis took charge. At ten years old, her childhood of happy memories was about to come to an abrupt end. When the Russians seized Königsberg, she was held captive within her own city. While most ethnic Germans remaining in Königsberg died, she survived and was able to leave two years later as a refugee. Without her parents, she would have never survived what her father called “hell on earth.” When she left Germany for the United States of America, he was the one who told her to make sure to tell the world her story. Despite all that she’s suffered through, her zest for life comes across in full force in this tale that reveals remarkable lessons about history, perseverance, love, and forgiveness. Join her as she shares her life story in Thank You God, for Leading Me Home.
Forgotten Land
Author: Max Egremont
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 1429969334
Pages: 384
Year: 2011-11-08
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Until the end of World War II, East Prussia was the German empire's farthest eastern redoubt, a thriving and beautiful land on the southeastern coast of the Baltic Sea. Now it lives only in history and in myth. Since 1945, the territory has been divided between Poland and Russia, stretching from the border between Russia and Lithuania in the east and south, and through Poland in the west. In Forgotten Land, Max Egremont offers a vivid account of this region and its people through the stories of individuals who were intimately involved in and transformed by its tumultuous history, as well as accounts of his own travels and interviews he conducted along the way. Forgotten Land is a story of historical identity and character, told through intimate portraits of people and places. It is a unique examination of the layers of history, of the changing perceptions and myths of homeland, of virtue and of wickedness, and of how a place can still overwhelm those who left it years before.
The Porcupine of Truth
Author: Bill Konigsberg
Publisher: Scholastic Inc.
ISBN: 0545648947
Pages: 336
Year: 2015-05-26
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The Stonewall Book Award-winning novel from the author of Openly Straight and Honestly Ben! "Words like 'brilliant' are so overused when praising novels--so I won't use that word. I'll just think it." -- Benjamin Alire Sáenz, author of Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe "Undeniably human and unforgettably wise, this book is a gift for us all." -- Andrew Smith, author of Grasshopper Jungle Carson Smith is resigned to spending his summer in Billings, Montana, helping his mom take care of his father, a dying alcoholic he doesn't really know. Then he meets Aisha Stinson, a beautiful girl who has run away from her difficult family, and discovers a secret regarding his grandfather, who disappeared without warning or explanation decades before. Together, Carson and Aisha embark on an epic road trip to try and save Carson's dad, restore his fragmented family, and discover the "Porcupine of Truth" in all of their lives.
Memoirs Of A Cold War Son
Author: Post, Jr. Gaines
Publisher: University of Iowa Press
ISBN: 1587293048
Pages: 248
Year: 2002-04-25
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In 1951 Gaines Post was a gangly, bespectacled, introspective teenager preparing to spend a year in Paris with his professorial father and older brother; his mother, who suffered from extreme depression, had been absent from the family for some time. Ten years later, now less gangly but no less introspective, he was finishing a two-year stint in the army in West Germany and heading toward Oxford on a Rhodes scholarship, having narrowly escaped combat in the Berlin crisis of 1961. His quietly intense coming-of-age story is both self-revealing and reflective of an entire generation of young men who came to adulthood before the Cuban Missile Crisis and the Vietnam War. Post's experiences in high school in Madison, Wisconsin, and Paris, his Camus-influenced undergraduate years at Cornell University, and his army service in Germany are set very effectively against the events of the Cold War. McCarthyism and American crackdowns on dissidents, American foreign and military policy in Western Europe in the nuclear age, French and German life and culture, crises in Paris and Berlin that nearly bring the West to war and the Post family to dissolution—these are the larger scenes and subjects of his self-disclosure as a contemplative, conflicted "Cold War agnostic." His intelligent, talented mother and her fragile health hover over Post's narrative, informing his hesitant relationships with women and his acutely questioning sense of self-worth. His story is strongly academic and historical as well as political and military; his perceptions and judgments lean toward no ideological extreme but remain true to the heroic ideals of his boyhood during the Second World War.
War beyond Words
Author: Jay Winter
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108293476
Pages:
Year: 2017-07-06
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What we know of war is always mediated knowledge and feeling. We need lenses to filter out some of its blinding, terrifying light. These lenses are not fixed; they change over time, and Jay Winter's panoramic history of war and memory offers an unprecedented study of transformations in our imaginings of war, from 1914 to the present. He reveals the ways in which different creative arts have framed our meditations on war, from painting and sculpture to photography, film and poetry, and ultimately to silence, as a language of memory in its own right. He shows how these highly mediated images of war, in turn, circulate through language to constitute our 'cultural memory' of war. This is a major contribution to our understanding of the diverse ways in which men and women have wrestled with the intractable task of conveying what twentieth-century wars meant to them and mean to us.
RAF Wings Over Florida
Author: Willard Largent
Publisher: Purdue University Press
ISBN: 1557532036
Pages: 258
Year: 2000
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"In their own words, British pilots tell of their Florida experiences. Many of them still in their late teens, away from home the first time, pale and thin from years of rationing, these young men encountered immense challenges and overwhelming generosity during their training in Florida. Now retired, these former pilots still smell the scent of orange blossoms when they glance through the log books they kept while flying their Stearmans and Harvards over Florida citrus groves. They fondly remember the times when they buzzed over the homes of their Florida "families" to let them know to expect them for Sunday dinner. More than fifty years later, their stories still resonate with universal emotions: fear of failure, love of country, camaraderie, romantic love, and the pain of tragic deaths. Their stories also remind the American reader of a unique time in our history, when, poised on the brink of war, the United States reached out to help a country in distress."--BOOK JACKET.
The Illustrated London News
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Year: 1863
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Houdini, Tarzan, and the Perfect Man
Author: John F. Kasson
Publisher: Hill and Wang
ISBN: 1429930039
Pages: 288
Year: 2002-07-02
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A remarkable new work from one of our premier historians In his exciting new book, John F. Kasson examines the signs of crisis in American life a century ago, signs that new forces of modernity were affecting men's sense of who and what they really were. When the Prussian-born Eugene Sandow, an international vaudeville star and bodybuilder, toured the United States in the 1890s, Florenz Ziegfeld cannily presented him as the "Perfect Man," representing both an ancient ideal of manhood and a modern commodity extolling self-development and self-fulfillment. Then, when Edgar Rice Burroughs's Tarzan swung down a vine into the public eye in 1912, the fantasy of a perfect white Anglo-Saxon male was taken further, escaping the confines of civilization but reasserting its values, beating his chest and bellowing his triumph to the world. With Harry Houdini, the dream of escape was literally embodied in spectacular performances in which he triumphed over every kind of threat to masculine integrity -- bondage, imprisonment, insanity, and death. Kasson's liberally illustrated and persuasively argued study analyzes the themes linking these figures and places them in their rich historical and cultural context. Concern with the white male body -- with exhibiting it and with the perils to it --reached a climax in World War I, he suggests, and continues with us today.
Am I a murderer?
Author: Calel Perechodnik, Frank Fox
Publisher: Harpercollins
ISBN:
Pages: 255
Year: 1996-01-15
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The diary of a young Polish Jew reveals his attempt to protect himself against Nazi persecution by becoming a policeman in a ghetto near Warsaw
Hellstorm
Author: Thomas Goodrich
Publisher: CreateSpace
ISBN: 1494775069
Pages: 390
Year: 2014-08-18
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Originally published: Sheridan, Colorado: Aberdeen Books, 2010.
The Rise of David Levinsky
Author: Abraham Cahan
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 527
Year: 1917
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New York Magazine
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ISBN:
Pages: 210
Year: 1996-06-24
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New York magazine was born in 1968 after a run as an insert of the New York Herald Tribune and quickly made a place for itself as the trusted resource for readers across the country. With award-winning writing and photography covering everything from politics and food to theater and fashion, the magazine's consistent mission has been to reflect back to its audience the energy and excitement of the city itself, while celebrating New York as both a place and an idea.
In Harm's Way
Author: Roger P. Minert
Publisher: Brigham Young University Religious Studies Center
ISBN: 084252746X
Pages: 545
Year: 2009
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The compelling and riveting stories of 7,500 members of the LDS Church in East Germany during World War II. These saints found themselves in precarious situations when World War II broke out. They were compelled to live under the tyranny of Nazi Germany and participate in offensive and defensive military actions.
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists
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Pages: 56
Year: 1993-06
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The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists is the premier public resource on scientific and technological developments that impact global security. Founded by Manhattan Project Scientists, the Bulletin's iconic "Doomsday Clock" stimulates solutions for a safer world.
The Examiner
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Year: 1855
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