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Romania
Author: Lucian Boia
Publisher: Reaktion Books
ISBN: 1861891032
Pages: 328
Year: 2001
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Romania occupies a unique position on the map of Eastern Europe. It is a country that presents many paradoxes. In this book the preeminent Romanian historian Lucian Boia examines his native land's development from the Middle Ages to modern times, delineating its culture, history, language, politics and ethnic identity. Boia introduces us to the heroes and myths of Romanian history, and provides an enlightening account of the history of Romanian Communism. He shows how modernization and the influence of the West have divided the nation - town versus country, nationalists versus pro-European factions, the elite versus the masses - and argues that Romania today is in chronic difficulty as it tries to fix its identity and envision a future for itself. The book concludes with a tour of Bucharest, whose houses, streets and public monuments embody Romania's traditional values and contemporary contradictions.
Romania
Author: Facts On File, Incorporated
Publisher: Infobase Publishing
ISBN: 1438122500
Pages:
Year: 2004-01-01
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This revised work on Romania looks at the country in light of the abandonment of the centrist coalition under Constantinescu. It discusses Romania's relationship with Hungary, it's support for NATO action against Serbia in 1999, and it's struggles to conform to a market-based economy.
Romania: Transylvania
Author: Lucy Mallows, Paul Brummell
Publisher: Bradt Travel Guides
ISBN: 1784770531
Pages: 352
Year: 2017-11-15
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This new, third edition of Bradt's Romania: Transylvania remains the only standalone English language guide to this legendary and enchanting region. Comprehensive chapter-per-county coverage is offered, including details to cater for the diverse range of travellers to the region, from city breaks to rural escapes, ski enthusiasts to charity volunteers. Thoroughly updated, this new edition reflects all the changes of the past few years, from improved transport infrastructure (in particular the regional airports at Cluj, Sibiu and Târgu Mures) to the completion of new motorway routes, such as that between Sibiu and Deva. Also covered are a number of striking new accommodation options: for example the sustainable guesthouse in Valea Zalanului owned by HRH The Prince of Wales, and the mountaintop retreat of Raven's Nest in the Apuseni Mountains. More attractions have opened up, such as Baroque palaces formerly owned by Hungarian aristocrats, seized under the Communist regime and now being restored by the descendants of their original owners. And the region is developing its offer for new types of tourism, such as summer rock festivals, notably the Untold Festival at Cluj and Electric Castle Festival at Bontida. Transylvania, literally the 'land beyond the forest', is a wild, wooded, intensely romantic region, filled with mountains, gorges and valleys, myths and legends, dragons, bears, wolves - and vampires. Bram Stoker called it 'one of the wildest and least-known parts of Europe' a description which remains true today. One of the most beautiful regions in central Europe and home to three UNESCO World Heritage Sites, Transylvania preserves its cultural and artistic treasures in a unique landscape, bordered on three sides by the Carpathian Mountains. The hay meadows of the lower Carpathians form a man-made, high nature-value grassland ecosystem of extraordinary diversity, offering a beautiful display of wild flowers. The Carpathians are home too to lynx, wild boar, and one of Europe's largest populations of brown bear. Other natural phenomena include the Scarisoara ice cave in the Apuseni Mountains and the Sfanta Ana volcanic crater lake in Harghita. Whatever your interests, with Bradt's Romania: Transylvania, you can discover all of the region's many and varied attractions.
Transylvania
Author: Lucy Mallows
Publisher: Bradt Travel Guides
ISBN: 1841624195
Pages: 296
Year: 2012-11-26
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A new edition of the most in-depth guide available to Transylvania, from creepy castles to medieval landscapes populated by vampires, bears and wolves.
The Phonetics and Phonology of Contrast
Author: Margaret E. L. Renwick
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
ISBN: 3110362775
Pages: 213
Year: 2014-09-12
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This book proposes that phonological contrast, in particular the robustness of a phonemic contrast, does not depend solely on the presence of minimal pairs, but is instead affected by a set of phonetic, usage-based, and systemic factors. This perspective opens phonology to a more direct interpretation through phonetic analysis, undertaken in a series of case studies on the Romanian vowel system. Both the synchronic phonetics and morpho-phonological alternations are studied, to understand the forces that have historically shaped and now maintain the phonemic system of Romanian. A corpus study of phoneme type frequency in Romanian reveals marginal contrasts among vowels, in which a sharp distinction between allophones and phonemes fails to capture relationships among sounds. An investigation of Romanian /Ɨ/ provides insight into the historical roots of marginal contrast, and a large acoustic study of Romanian vowels and diphthongs is a backdrop for evaluating the phonetic and perceptual realization of marginal contrast. The results provide impetus for a model in which phonology, phonetics, morphology and perception interact in a multidimensional way.
History and Myth in Romanian Consciousness
Author: Lucian Boia
Publisher: Central European University Press
ISBN: 9639116971
Pages: 285
Year: 2001-01-01
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Based on the idea that there is a considerable difference between reality and discourse, the author points out that history is constantly reconstructed, adapted and sometimes mythicized from the perspectives of the present day, present states of mind and ideologies. He closely examines historical culture and conscience in nineteenth and twentieth century Romania, particularly concentrating on the impact of the national ideology on history. Boia's innovative analysis identifies several key mythical configurations and shows how Romanians have reconstituted their own highly ideologized history over the last two centuries. The strength of History and Myth in Romanian Consciousness lies in the author's ability to fully deconstruct the entire Romanian historiographic system and demonstrate the increasing acuteness of national problems in general, and in particular the exploitation of history to support national ideology.
A Contested Borderland
Author: Andrei Cusco
Publisher: Central European University Press
ISBN: 9633861594
Pages: 338
Year: 2018-02-01
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Bessarabia?mostly occupied by modern-day republic of Moldova?was the only territory representing an object of rivalry and symbolic competition between the Russian Empire and a fully crystallized nation-state: the Kingdom of Romania. This book is an intellectual prehistory of the Bessarabian problem, focusing on the antagonism of the national and imperial visions of this contested periphery. Through a critical reassessment and revision of the traditional historical narratives, the study argues that Bessarabia was claimed not just by two opposing projects of ?symbolic inclusion,? but also by two alternative and theoretically antagonistic models of political legitimacy. By transcending the national lens of Bessarabian / Moldovan history and viewing it in the broader Eurasian comparative context, the book responds to the growing tendency in recent historiography to focus on the peripheries in order to better understand the functioning of national and imperial states in the modern era. ÿ
Border
Author: Kapka Kassabova
Publisher: Graywolf Press
ISBN: 1555979785
Pages: 400
Year: 2017-09-05
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“Remarkable: a book about borders that makes the reader feel sumptuously free.” —Peter Pomerantsev In this extraordinary work of narrative reportage, Kapka Kassabova returns to Bulgaria, from where she emigrated as a girl twenty-five years previously, to explore the border it shares with Turkey and Greece. When she was a child, the border zone was rumored to be an easier crossing point into the West than the Berlin Wall, and it swarmed with soldiers and spies. On holidays in the “Red Riviera” on the Black Sea, she remembers playing on the beach only miles from a bristling electrified fence whose barbs pointed inward toward the enemy: the citizens of the totalitarian regime. Kassabova discovers a place that has been shaped by successive forces of history: the Soviet and Ottoman empires, and, older still, myth and legend. Her exquisite portraits of fire walkers, smugglers, treasure hunters, botanists, and border guards populate the book. There are also the ragged men and women who have walked across Turkey from Syria and Iraq. But there seem to be nonhuman forces at work here too: This densely forested landscape is rich with curative springs and Thracian tombs, and the tug of the ancient world, of circular time and animism, is never far off. Border is a scintillating, immersive travel narrative that is also a shadow history of the Cold War, a sideways look at the migration crisis troubling Europe, and a deep, witchy descent into interior and exterior geographies.
Cambodia
Author: Michael Freeman
Publisher: Reaktion Books
ISBN: 1861894465
Pages: 197
Year: 2004-01-04
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Cambodia has a long and rich history, first becoming an artistic and religious power in Southeast Asia in the Angkor period (802–1432), when its kings ruled from vast temple complexes at Angkor Wat and Angkor Thom. The cultural influence of Cambodia on other countries in the region has been enormous, quite out of keeping with its reduced territory and limited political and economic power today. In Cambodia, writer and photographer Michael Freeman examines the country’s present troubled situation in the light of its political and cultural history, looking at many aspects of modern Cambodia, including the psychological effect of the outrages of Pol Pot, and how Angkor Wat has become an icon and symbol for its tourist and heritage industry. In the process he relates personal stories and anecdotes from Cambodia’s recent and more ancient history, such as royal white elephants and buffalo sacrifices in villages; how spiders are cooked and eaten; and the incidence of cannibalism in Cambodian warfare. Cambodia is sometimes shocking, often humorous, and always entertaining, and will give the reader a new insight into the history of this maltreated yet fascinating country.
Mapping Europe's Borderlands
Author: Steven Seegel
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226744256
Pages: 368
Year: 2012-05-14
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The simplest purpose of a map is a rational one: to educate, to solve a problem, to point someone in the right direction. Maps shape and communicate information, for the sake of improved orientation. But maps exist for states as well as individuals, and they need to be interpreted as expressions of power and knowledge, as Steven Seegel makes clear in his impressive and important new book. Mapping Europe’s Borderlands takes the familiar problems of state and nation building in eastern Europe and presents them through an entirely new prism, that of cartography and cartographers. Drawing from sources in eleven languages, including military, historical-pedagogical, and ethnographic maps, as well as geographic texts and related cartographic literature, Seegel explores the role of maps and mapmakers in the East Central European borderlands from the Enlightenment to the Treaty of Versailles. For example, Seegel explains how Russia used cartography in the aftermath of the Napoleonic Wars and, later, formed its geography society as a cover for gathering intelligence. He also explains the importance of maps to the formation of identities and institutions in Poland, Ukraine, and Lithuania, as well as in Russia. Seegel concludes with a consideration of the impact of cartographers’ regional and socioeconomic backgrounds, educations, families, career options, and available language choices.
The Role of Borderlands in United Europe
Author: Krystian Heffner
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 229
Year: 2005
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Conflict Landscapes and Archaeology from Above
Author: Birger Stichelbaut, David Cowley
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351949691
Pages: 368
Year: 2016-12-05
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The study of conflict archaeology has developed rapidly over the last decade, fuelled in equal measure by technological advances and creative analytical frameworks. Nowhere is this truer than in the inter-disciplinary fields of archaeological practice that combine traditional sources such as historical photographs and maps with 3D digital topographic data from Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) and large scale geophysical prospection. For twentieth-century conflict landscapes and their surviving archaeological remains, these developments have encouraged a shift from a site oriented approach towards landscape-scaled research. This volume brings together an wide range of perspectives, setting traditional approaches that draw on historical and contemporary aerial photographs alongside cutting-edge prospection techniques, cross-disciplinary analyses and innovative methods of presenting this material to audiences. Essays from a range of disciplines (archaeology, history, geography, heritage and museum studies) studying conflict landscapes across the globe throughout the twentieth century, all draw on aerial and landscape perspectives to past conflicts and their legacy and the complex issues for heritage management. Organized in four parts, the first three sections take a broadly chronological approach, exploring the use of aerial evidence to expand our understanding of the two World Wars and the Cold War. The final section explores ways that the aerial perspective can be utilized to represent historical landscapes to a wide audience. With case studies ranging from the Western Front to the Cold War, Ireland to Russia, this volume demonstrates how an aerial perspective can both support and challenge traditional archaeological and historical analysis, providing an innovative new means of engaging with the material culture of conflict and commemoration.
Cataclysms
Author: Dan Diner
Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press
ISBN: 0299223531
Pages: 336
Year: 2008-01-05
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Cataclysms is a profoundly original look at the last century. Approaching twentieth-century history from the periphery rather than the centers of decision-making, the virtual narrator sits perched on the legendary stairs of Odessa and watches as events between the Baltic and the Aegean pass in review, unfolding in space and time between 1917 and 1989, while evoking the nineteenth century as an interpretative backdrop. Influenced by continental historical, legal, and social thought, Dan Diner views the totality of world history evolving from an Eastern and Southeastern European angle. A work of great synthesis, Cataclysms chronicles twentieth century history as a “universal civil war” between a succession of conflicting dualisms such as freedom and equality, race and class, capitalism and communism, liberalism and fascism, East and West. Diner’s interpretation rotates around cataclysmic events in the transformation from multinational empires into nation states, accompanied by social revolution and “ethnic cleansing,” situating the Holocaust at the core of the century’s predicament. Unlike other Eurocentric interpretations of the last century, Diner also highlights the emerging pivotal importance of the United States and the impact of decolonization on the process of European integration.
The Peaks of the Balkans Trail
Author: Rudolf Abraham
Publisher: Cicerone Press Limited
ISBN: 1783625562
Pages: 160
Year: 2018-03-15
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A guidebook to the Peaks of the Balkans Trail, a circular route through the wild and rugged borderlands of Montenegro, Albania and Kosovo. Launched in 2013 to promote sustainable local tourism and transcend political borders, the 192km trail winds its way through the spectacular scenery of the Prokletije mountains (the southernmost range of the Dinaric Alps), taking in high passes, sweeping valleys and striking limestone peaks. It can be completed in around two weeks: the walking itself is not difficult though the route passes through some remote areas and demands a moderate level of fitness. Welcoming guesthouses and homestays offer accommodation and delicious local cuisine on route, though camping is also a possibility. The guide presents the trail in 10 daily stages and also includes suggestions for excursions to bag neighbouring peaks and visit local sites of interest. Comprehensive route description is accompanied by mapping and colour photos. You will find everything you need to plan a successful trip: guidance on how to get to the route, advice on when to go, where to start your trek and what to take, and information on cross-border permits. Appendices include accommodation listings, useful contacts and an English-Albanian-Montenegrin glossary. The trail has opened up this little-known corner of Europe to trekkers. Yet, despite increasing visitor numbers, the region remains underdeveloped and unspoilt, with traditional mountain villages that feel like somewhere time forgot nestled in dramatic alpine landscapes. Promising spectacular scenery and genuine hospitality, the Peaks of the Balkans Trail invites you to discover the magic of the magnificent mountains of the Balkans.
Polish-Slovak Borderland
Author: Marek Więckowski, Daniel Michniak, Maria Bednarek-Szczepańska, Bronislav Chrenka, Vladimir Ira, Tomasz Komornicki, Piotr Rosik, Marcin Stępniak, Vladimir Székely, Przemysław Śleszyński, Dariusz Świątek, Rafał Wiśniewski
Publisher: IGiPZ PAN
ISBN: 8361590978
Pages: 323
Year: 2012
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