Psychoanalysis And Psychoanalytic Therapies Theories Of Psychotherapy Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

Psychoanalysis and Psychoanalytic Therapies
Author: Jeremy D. Safran
Publisher: Amer Psychological Assn
ISBN: 1433809788
Pages: 232
Year: 2012-01
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In Psychoanalysis and Psychoanalytic Therapies, Jeremy D. Safran discusses this uniquely influential theory and set of approaches. Initially founded on the principles and practice of Sigmund Freud, these therapies and psychoanalytic theory have been developed and elaborated over the past century by a variety of theorists, clinicians, and researchers. There are many different approaches to psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic therapy, but they all tend to share features in common, such as a focus on the exploration and expression of feelings and efforts to avoid painful feelings and experiences; exploration of clients' ambivalence about changing; identification of self-defeating patterns of feeling, thinking, and relating; exploration of wishes and dreams; and exploration of the therapeutic relationship. Safran presents and explores this influential, practical, and thoughtful approach, its theory, history, therapy process, primary change mechanisms, and the empirical basis for its effectiveness. He also examines developments that have refined the theory and expanded how it may be practiced. This essential primer, amply illustrated with case examples featuring diverse clients, is perfect for graduate students studying theories of therapy and counseling, as well as for seasoned practitioners interested in understanding how this approach has evolved and how it might be used in their practice. Part of the Theories of Psychotherapy Series.
Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy
Author: Michelle G. Craske
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
ISBN: 1433827484
Pages:
Year: 2017
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In this revised edition of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, Michelle G. Craske provides vital updated coverage of the literature that explores the theory, history, therapy process, primary change mechanisms, and empirical basis of the approach, as well as likely future developments. This essential primer to cognitive behavioral therapy, amply illustrated with case examples featuring diverse clients, is perfect for graduate students studying theories of therapy and counseling as well as for seasoned practitioners interested in better understanding this approach.
Relational Theory and the Practice of Psychotherapy
Author: Paul L. Wachtel
Publisher: Guilford Press
ISBN: 1609180453
Pages: 338
Year: 2010-10-19
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This important and innovative book explores a new direction in psychoanalytic thought that can expand and deepen clinical practice. Relational psychoanalysis diverges in key ways from the assumptions and practices that have traditionally characterized psychoanalysis. At the same time, it preserves, and even extends, the profound understanding of human experience and psychological conflict that has always been the strength of the psychoanalytic approach. Through probing theoretical analysis and illuminating examples, the book offers new and powerful ways to revitalize clinical practice.
Existential Humanistic Therapy
Author: Kirk J. Schneider, Orah T. Krug
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
ISBN: 1433827379
Pages: 188
Year: 2017
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This revised primer provides an updated introduction to the theory, history, research, and practice of existential-humanistic therapy, which merges existential philosophy with humanistic psychotherapy, along with recent trends in existential-integrative therapy.
Emotion, Psychotherapy, and Change
Author: Jeremy D. Safran, Leslie S. Greenberg
Publisher: Guilford Press
ISBN: 0898625564
Pages: 372
Year: 1991-03-08
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EMOTION, PSYCHOTHERAPY, AND CHANGE represents a systematic attempt to map the various ways emotion influences the change process and to clarify the underlying mechanisms. A continuation of the editors' pioneering work, EMOTION IN PSYCHOTHERAPY, this volume makes a significant contribution to the development of a transtheoretical approach to affective change events. Viewing emotional experience as an active ingredient in, rather than a by-product of, the change process, the book explores the ramifications of this understanding for the conduct of therapy. A thorough review of the theory and therapeutic implications of emotion in human functioning precedes chapters by representatives of three different therapeutic traditions: cognitive-behavioral, psychodynamic, and experiential. Contributors identify and describe the key affective change events important in their respective approaches and then speculate about the underlying processes. Included here are detailed descriptions of relevant therapist-client interactions as well as clinical transcripts that vividly illustrate the process of change. A separate, theory-oriented commentary section follows in which the theme of emotion in psychotherapy is examined from the perspectives of cognitive psychology and emotion theory. A synthesis and critical analysis of affective change processes rounds out the volume. EMOTION, PSYCHOTHERAPY, AND CHANGE satisfies its practical and theoretical objectives by providing detailed descriptions of intervention strategies while explicating how and why these interventions work. Its attention to both theory and practice, and its synthesis of different theoretical traditions, make this volume essential reading for seasoned psychotherapists, researchers, and students.
Modes of Therapeutic Action
Author: Martha Stark
Publisher: Jason Aronson, Incorporated
ISBN: 076570742X
Pages: 384
Year: 2000-12-01
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How do we position ourselves, moment by moment, in relation to our patients and how do these positions inform both what we come to know about our patients and how we intervene? Do we participate as neutral object, as empathic self-object, or as authentic subject? Do we strive to enhance the patient's knowledge, to provide a corrective experience, or to work at the intimate edge? In an effort to answer these and other clinically relevant questions about the process of psychotherapeutic change, Martha Stark has developed a comprehensive theory of therapeutic action that integrates the interpretive perspective of classical psychoanalysis (Model 1), the corrective-provision perspective of self psychology and those object relations theories emphasizing the internal 'absence of good' (Model 2), and the relational perspective of contemporary psychoanalysis and those object relations theories emphasizing the internal 'presence of bad' (Model 3). Model I is about knowledge and insight. It is a one-person psychology because its focus is on the patient and the internal workings of her mind. Model 2 is about corrective experience. It is a one-and-a-half-person psychology because its emphasis is not so much on the relationship per se, but on the filling in of the patient's deficits by way of the therapist's corrective provision; what ultimately matters is not who the therapist is, but, rather, what she can offer. Model 3 is about relationship, the real relationship. It is a two-person psychology because its focus is on patients and therapists who relate to each other as real people; it is about mutuality, reciprocity, and intersubjectivity. Whereas Model 2 is about 'give' and involves the therapist's bringing the best of who she is into the room, Model 3 is about 'give-and-take' and involves the therapist's bringing all of who she is into the room. As Dr. Stark repeatedly demonstrates in numerous clinical vignettes, the three modes of therapeutic actionDknowledge, experience, and relationshipDare not mutually exclusive but mutually enhancing. If, as therapists, we can tolerate the necessary uncertainty that comes with the recognition that there is an infinite variety of possibilities for change, then we will be able to enhance the therapeutic potential of each moment and optimize our effectiveness as clinicians.
Cognitive Therapy
Author: Keith S. Dobson
Publisher: Amer Psychological Assn
ISBN: 1433810883
Pages: 154
Year: 2012
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This edition in the Theories of Psychotherapy series provides a brief and accessible survey of this popular, time-limited form of psychotherapy for specific functional problems. The author provides a historical overview of the approach; an outline of the cognitive therapeutic model and its central tenets, such as maladaptive schemas, automatic thoughts and cognitive distortions (e.g., maximization/minimization, fortune-telling, catastrophization); and an overview of evidence-based strategies, as well as "collaborative empiricism" in the therapeutic alliance. Cognitive Therapy examines the therapy's process, evaluates its evidence base and effectiveness, and suggests future directions in the development of the therapy.
Psychoanalytic Therapy and the Gay Man
Author: Jack Drescher
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317771311
Pages: 384
Year: 2014-05-22
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Do the conventional insights of depth psychology have anything to offer the gay patient? Can contemporary psychoanalytic theory be used to make sense of gay identities in ways that are helpful rather than hurtful, respectful rather than retraumatizing? In Psychoanalytic Therapy and the Gay Man Jack Drescher addresses these very questions as he outlines a therapeutic approach to issues of sexual identity that is informed by traditional therapeutic goals (such as psychological integration and more authentic living) while still respecting, even honoring, variations in sexual orientation. Drescher's exploration of the subjectivities of gay men in psychoanalytic psychotherapy is more than a long-overdue corrective to the inadequate and often pathologizing tomes of traditional psychoanalytic writers. It is a vitally human testament to the richly varied inner experiences of gay men. Drescher does not assume that sexual orientation is the entire or even major focus of intensive psychotherapy. But he does argue, passionately and convincingly, that issues of sexual identity - which encompass a spectrum of possibilities for any gay man - must be addressed in an atmosphere of honest encounter that allows not only for exploration of conflict and dissociation but also for restitutive confirmation of the patient's right to be himself. Through its abundance of first-person testimony from both clinical and literary sources, Psychoanalytic Therapy and the Gay Man provides the reader with an unforgettable grasp of what it is like to discover that one is gay in our society and then to find the courage and humanity to live with that knowledge. Any mental health professional - regardless of his or her sexual orientation - who wishes to deal therapeutically with gay men will find Drescher's work indispensable. But it will also be compelling reading for anyone seeking psychological insight into gay men's lives and concerns.
Theory and Practice of Brief Therapy
Author: Simon H. Budman, Alan S. Gurman
Publisher: Guilford Publications
ISBN: 1462527507
Pages: 402
Year: 2016-03-14
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This classic work provides a richly textured overview of the "whys" and "hows" of brief therapy. The authors identify the central features of effective, time-limited interventions for individuals, couples, families, and groups. Taking a developmental approach to treatment, they explain how brief therapy can help at different times in a patient's life, as changes and transitions bring on new stresses and challenges. A practical framework is provided for selecting and screening patients, rapidly finding a focus for clinical work, and making optimal use of available time. Case examples and extensive transcripts are included to illustrate the use of strategies and techniques drawn from many different psychotherapy perspectives. Throughout, the focus is on creative and efficient ways to help patients build on existing strengths and make desired changes in their interactions with others.
Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy
Author: Nancy McWilliams
Publisher: Guilford Press
ISBN: 1593850093
Pages: 353
Year: 2004-03-18
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Building on the enormous popularity of her two previous texts on diagnosis and case formulation, this important work from Nancy McWilliams completes the trilogy by addressing in detail the art and science of psychodynamic treatment. McWilliams distills the essential principles of clinical practice, including effective listening and talking; transference and countertransference; emotional safety; and an empathic, attuned attitude toward the patient. The author describes the values, assumptions, and clinical and research findings that guide the psychoanalytic enterprise, and shows how to integrate elements of other theoretical perspectives when necessary. She also discusses the phases of treatment and covers such neglected topics as educating the client about the therapeutic process, handling complex challenges to boundaries, and attending to self-care. Presenting complex clinical information in personal, nontechnical language enriched by in-depth clinical vignettes, this is an essential psychoanalytic work and training text for therapists.
Interpersonal Process in Cognitive Therapy
Author: Jeremy Safran, Zindel V. Segal
Publisher: Jason Aronson, Incorporated
ISBN: 1461628997
Pages: 312
Year: 1996-09-01
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Illustrates the subtle interaction of cognitive and interpersonal factors.
Fundamentals of Psychoanalytic Technique: A Lacanian Approach for Practitioners
Author: Bruce Fink
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393707369
Pages: 320
Year: 2011-04-26
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An introduction to psychoanalytic technique from a Lacanian perspective. What does it mean to practice psychoanalysis as Jacques Lacan did? How did Lacan translate his original theoretical insights into moment-to-moment psychoanalytic technique? And what makes a Lacanian approach to treatment different from other approaches? These are among the questions that Bruce Fink, a leading translator and expositor of Lacan's work, addresses in Fundamentals of Psychoanalytic Technique by describing and amply exemplifying the innovative techniques (such as punctuation, scansion, and oracular interpretation) developed by Lacan to uncover unconscious desire, lift repression, and bring about change. Unlike any other writer on Lacan to date, Fink illustrates his Lacanian approach to listening, questioning, punctuating, scanding, and interpreting with dozens of actual clinical examples. He clearly outlines the fundamentals of working with dreams, daydreams, and fantasies, discussing numerous anxiety dreams, nightmares, and fantasies told to him by his own patients. By examining transference and countertransference in detail through the use of clinical vignettes, Fink lays out the major differences (regarding transference interpretation, self-disclosure, projective identification, and the therapeutic frame) between mainstream psychoanalytic practice and Lacanian practice. He critiques the ever more prevalent normalizing attitude in psychoanalysis today and presents crucial facets of Lacan's approach to the treatment of neurosis, as well as of his entirely different approach to the treatment of psychosis. Fundamentals of Psychoanalytic Technique is an introduction to psychoanalytic technique from a Lacanian perspective that is based on Fink's many years of experience working as an analyst and supervising clinicians, including graduate students in clinical psychology, social workers, psychiatrists, psychotherapists, and psychoanalysts. Designed for a wide range of practitioners and requiring no previous knowledge of Lacan's work, this primer is accessible to therapists of many different persuasions with diverse degrees of clinical experience, from novices to seasoned analysts. Fink's goal throughout is to present the implications of Lacan's highly novel work for psychoanalytic technique across a broad spectrum of interventions. The techniques covered (all of which are designed to get at the unconscious, repression, and repetition compulsion) can be helpful to a wide variety of practitioners, often transforming their practices radically in a few short months.
Psychoanalysis and Buddhism
Author: Jeremy D. Safran
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0861713427
Pages: 443
Year: 2003
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Psychoanalysis and Buddhism pairs Buddhist psychotherapists together with leading figures in psychoanalysis who have a general interest in the role of spirituality in psychology. The resulting essays present an illuminating discourse on these two disciplines and how they intersect. This landmark book challenges traditional thoughts on psychoanalysis and Buddhism and propels them to a higher level of understanding.
The How-To Book for Students of Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy
Author: Sheldon Bach
Publisher: Karnac Books
ISBN: 1780497989
Pages: 70
Year: 2011-04-01
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This is a book that grew out of the many practical "how-to" questions that the author's psychotherapy students have asked him over the years. It is neither an evidence-based compendium nor an attempt to summarize general practice or the viewpoints of others, but rather a handbook of practical answers to many of the questions that may puzzle students of psychotherapy and psychoanalysis. Some of the short chapters include:How to choose a personal psychoanalystHow to do an initial interviewHow to listen to a patientHow to recognize and understand self-states, multiple identities, true and false selves, etc.How to tell what the transference isHow to deal with the sadomasochistic transferenceHow to understand the need for recognitionHow to think about analytic processHow to practice holistic healingHow to refer a patient for medicationHow to get paid for your workHow to manage vacations, weekends, illnesses, no-shows and other disturbances of continuityWhile trying to give simple answers to sometimes very difficult questions, it is written at a level of sophistication that may make it of interest even to experienced practitioners.
Developmental Perspectives in Child Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy
Author: Christopher Bonovitz, Andrew Harlem
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351235486
Pages: 298
Year: 2018-02-15
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Developmental Perspectives in Child Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy incorporates recent innovations in developmental theory and research into our understanding of the nature of change in child psychotherapy. Diverse psychoanalytic ideas and individual styles are represented, challenging the historical allegiance in analytic child therapy to particular, and so often singular, schools of thought. Each of the distinguished contributors offers a conceptually grounded and clinically rich account of child development, addressing topics such as refl ective functioning, the role of play, dreaming, trauma and neglect, the development of recognition and mutuality, autism, adoption, and non- binary conceptions of gender. Extended clinical vignettes offer the reader clear vision into the convergence of theory and practice, demonstrating the potential of psychoanalytic psychotherapy to move child development forward. This book will appeal to all practicing mental health professionals.