Pepyss Navy Ships Men And Warfare 1649 89 Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

Pepys’s Navy
Author: J. D. Davies
Publisher: Seaforth Publishing
ISBN: 1848320140
Pages: 320
Year: 2008-11-20
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This new reference book describes every aspect the English navy in the second half of the seventeenth century, from the time when the Fleet Royal was taken into Parliamentary control after the defeat of Charles I, until the accession of William and Mary in 1689 when the long period of war with the Dutch came to an end. This is a crucial era which witnessed the creation of a permanent naval service, in essence the birth of the Royal Navy. Every aspect of the navy is covered - naval administration, ship types and shipbuilding, naval recruitment and crews, seamanship and gunnery, shipboard life, dockyards and bases, the foreign navies of the period, and the three major wars which were fought against the Dutch in the Channel and the North Sea. Samuel Pepys, whose thirty years of service did so much to replace the ad hoc processes of the past with systems for construction and administration, is one of the most significant players, and the navy which was, by 1690, ready for the 100 years of global struggle with the French owed much to his tireless work. This book is destined to become a major work for historians, naval enthusiasts and, indeed, anyone with an interest in this colourful era of the seventeenth century.
Ireland and the War at Sea, 1641-1653
Author: Elaine Murphy
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer Ltd
ISBN: 0861933184
Pages: 253
Year: 2012
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An examination of the mid-seventeenth century maritime battles between Ireland, England, and Scotland, showing them to have had a dramatic impact on the overall conflict.
Kings of the Sea
Author: J David Davies
Publisher: Seaforth Publsihing
ISBN: 1848324030
Pages: 288
Year: 2017-08-30
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It has always been widely accepted that the Stuart kings, Charles II and James II, had an interest in the navy and more generally in the sea. Their enthusiastic delight in sailing, for instance, is often cited as marking the establishment of yachting in England. The major naval developments in their reigns on the other hand – developments that effectively turned the Royal Navy into a permanent, professional fighting force for the first time – have traditionally been attributed to Samuel Pepys. This new book, based on a wide range of new and previously neglected evidence, presents a provocative new theory: that the creation of the proper ‘Royal Navy’ was in fact due principally to the Stuart brothers, particularly Charles II, who is presented here, not as the lazy monarch neglectful of the detail of government, but as a king with an acute and detailed interest in naval affairs. The author also demonstrates that Charles’ Stuart predecessors were far more directly involved in naval matters than has usually been allowed, and proves that Charles’ and James’ command of ship design and other technical matters went well beyond the bounds of dilettante enthusiasm. It is shown how Charles in particular, intervened in ship design discussions at a highly technical level; how the brothers were principally responsible for the major reforms that established a permanent naval profession; and how they personally sponsored important expeditions and projects such as Greenvile Collins’ survey of British waters. The book also reassesses James II’s record as a fighting admiral. It is a fascinating journey into the world of the Stuart navy and shows how the ‘Kings of the Sea’ were absolutely central to the development of its ships, their deployment and the officer corps which commanded them; it offers a major reassessment of that dynasty’s involvement in naval warfare.
Britannia's Dragon
Author: J. D. Davies
Publisher: The History Press
ISBN: 0752494104
Pages: 288
Year: 2013-07-01
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Wales has a long coastline, and nowhere is more than about 40 miles from the sea or a navigable river. From the earliest times, Welshmen have used the sea and the sea has shaped the history of the country. Seapower was arguably one of the most decisive factors in ending the nation's independence. The Welsh contribution to piracy has long been recognized, and Britannia's Dragon presents new and sometimes surprising evidence, such as the fact that relative to the populations of the retrospective countries, proportionately more Welshmen fought at Trafalgar than Scots, Irishmen or even Englishmen. The book also examines the invaluable contribution made by Welsh industry—especially coal and copper—to naval history, and considers such themes as shipbuilding and shipwrecks.
Disciplining the Empire
Author: Sarah Kinkel
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674985311
Pages: 296
Year: 2018-05-07
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“Rule Britannia! Britannia rule the waves,” goes the popular lyric. The fact that the British built the world’s greatest empire on the basis of sea power has led many to assume that the Royal Navy’s place in British life was unchallenged. Yet, as Sarah Kinkel shows, the Navy was the subject of bitter political debate. The rise of British naval power was neither inevitable nor unquestioned: it was the outcome of fierce battles over the shape of Britain’s empire and the bonds of political authority. Disciplining the Empire explains why the Navy became divisive within Anglo-imperial society even though it was also successful in war. The eighteenth century witnessed the global expansion of British imperial rule, the emergence of new forms of political radicalism, and the fracturing of the British Atlantic in a civil war. The Navy was at the center of these developments. Advocates of a more strictly governed, centralized empire deliberately reshaped the Navy into a disciplined and hierarchical force which they hoped would win battles but also help control imperial populations. When these newly professionalized sea officers were sent to the front lines of trade policing in North America during the 1760s, opponents saw it as an extension of executive power and military authority over civilians—and thus proof of constitutional corruption at home. The Navy was one among many battlefields where eighteenth-century British subjects struggled to reconcile their debates over liberty and anarchy, and determine whether the empire would be ruled from Parliament down or the people up.
Tudor and Stuart Seafarers
Author: James Davey
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 147295677X
Pages: 272
Year: 2018-08-09
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Tudor and Stuart Seafarers tells the compelling story of how a small island positioned on the edge of Europe transformed itself into the world's leading maritime power. In 1485, England was an inward-looking country, its priorities largely domestic and European. Over the subsequent two centuries, however, this country was transformed, as the people of the British Isles turned to the sea in search of adventure, wealth and rule. Explorers voyaged into unknown regions of the world, while merchants, following in their wake, established lucrative trade routes with the furthest reaches of the globe. At home, people across Britain increasingly engaged with the sea, whether through their own lived experiences or through songs, prose and countless other forms of material culture. This exquisitely illustrated book delves into a tale of exploration, encounter, adventure, power, wealth and conflict. Topics include the exploration of the Americas, the growth of worldwide trade, piracy and privateering and the defeat of the Spanish Armada, brought to life through a variety of personalities from the well-known – Elizabeth I, Sir Francis Drake and Samuel Pepys – to the ordinary sailors, dockyard workers and their wives and families whose lives were so dramatically shaped by the sea.
The Terror of the Seas?
Author: Steve Murdoch
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004185682
Pages: 444
Year: 2010
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This book places early modern Scottish maritime warfare in its European context. Its formidably broad range of sources sheds light on many previously little known, or unknown, aspects of naval history. It also provides many valuable new perspectives on the importance of the sea to the Scots, and of the Scots to the naval history of Great Britain.
Four Days' Battle of 1666
Author: Frank L. Fox
Publisher: Seaforth Publsihing
ISBN: 1526737272
Pages: 448
Year: 2018-05-30
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On 1st June 1666, during the second Anglo-Dutch War, a large but outnumbered English Fleet engaged the Dutch off the mouth of the Thames in a colossal battle that was to involve nearly 200 ships and last four days. False intelligence had led the English to divide their fleet to meet a phantom fleet from France and although the errant squadron rejoined on the final day of the battle, it was not enough to redress the balance. More than 1,500 English sailors were killed, 2,000 taken prisoner and two vice admirals killed. The battle ended when the English escaped into a fog bank, both fleets by this time having expended their ammunition. Like many a defeat, it sparked controversy at the time, and has been the subject of speculation and debate ever since. The battle was an event of such overwhelming complexity that for centuries it defied description and deterred study, but this superbly researched book is now recognised as the definitive English-language account. First published in 1996, it provides the only clear exposition of the opposing forces, fils many holes in the narrative and answers most of the questions raised by the actions of the English commanders. The narrative is totally engrossing and worthy of what was the greatest battle anywhere in the age of sail, and this new paperback edition will bring the story to new readers who missed the book in its earlier editions.
Gentleman Captain
Author: J. D. Davies
Publisher: Canelo
ISBN: 1788631811
Pages: 300
Year: 2018-05-07
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Heroism, gunpowder and treachery in the Royal Navy 1662: After Matthew Quinton sunk the first ship he was given to command, he is surprised when the King gives him captaincy of H.M.S. Jupiter with orders to stamp out a Scottish rebellion. This time Quinton is determined to prove his worth. In a country of divided loyalties, Charles II needs someone he can trust, and – with an elder brother deep in the King’s confidence – Matthew is one of the few eligible candidates not serving in the Mediterranean. But now Quinton must face an unruly crew, suspicions of murder, stirrings of conspiracy and the angry seas. Will treason be found in Scotland... or is it lurking closer to home? Packed with gripping naval adventure, Gentleman Captain is the first in the epic Matthew Quinton Journals. It will enthral fans of Julian Stockwin, C.S. Forester’s Hornblower and Patrick O'Brian. ‘Hornblower, Aubrey and Quinton – a pantheon of the best adventures at sea!’ Conn Iggulden ‘Swashbuckling suspense, royal intrigue, and high seas naval action ... an excellent series’ Publishers Weekly ‘Utterly impossible to put down... finely-shaded characters, excellent plotting, gut-clenching action and immaculate attention to period detail ... superb’ Angus Donald, author of The Outlaw Chronicles The Matthew Quinton Journals 1. Gentleman Captain 2. The Mountain of Gold 3. The Blast that Tears the Skies 4. The Lion of Midnight 5. The Battle of the Ages 6. The Rage of Fortune 7. Death's Bright Angel 8. The Devil Upon the Wave
The Rage of Fortune
Author: J. D. Davies
Publisher:
ISBN: 1521749507
Pages: 281
Year: 2017-07-03
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The story begins in 1651, just after the Battle of Worcester, the final conflict of the British Civil Wars.Eleven-year-old Matthew Junior and his twin sister, Henrietta, are exploring an abandoned corner of their family home when they discover the long-forgotten papers of their grandfather.But their findings are interrupted by the arrival of Roundhead troops intent on searching for their elder brother, the tenth Earl of Ravensden, who has been seriously wounded in the Cavalier cause.Gradually, the papers of the old Earl and of some of those who knew him - including the recollections of his wife, Matthew and Herry's grandmother - start to paint a picture of a very different world.Dating back to the year 1598, they depict the world at the turn of the seventeenth century, when England was still fighting a seemingly endless war against Spain, when William Shakespeare was writing Henry V and Julius Caesar, and when the whole country was obsessed by the question of who would succeed the ageing Queen Elizabeth.The Rage of Fortune is set against the backdrop of a series of real historical events, depicting naval actions such as the affairs of Invisible Armada, and at the Battles of Castlehaven, Kinsale and Sesimbra Bay, as well as intrigues over the succession to the English throne.Epic sword fights and dramatic naval battles will delight readers of historical fiction, both those new to the Quinton series and especially those who have followed the series thus far. Praise for J D Davies 'Swashbuckling suspense, royal intrigue, and high seas naval action . . . an excellent series' - Publishers Weekly'Exciting, emotive and utterly convincing, the Quinton Journals lead the field in naval historical fiction' - Sam Willis, TV presenter and bestselling author of The Glorious First of June'Finely shaded characters, excellent plotting, gut-clenching action and immaculate attention to period naval detail...these are superb books' - Angus Donald, author of The Outlaw ChroniclesJ D Davies was educated at Llanelli Grammar School and Jesus College, Oxford, where he completed a doctorate in 17th century naval history. He taught History for thirty years, chiefly at Bedford Modern School, where he also served as a Deputy Headmaster. He won the Samuel Pepys prize in 2009 for his book, Pepys's Navy: Ships, Men and Warfare 1649-89, and is also a previous winner of the Julian Corbett prize for naval history. His acclaimed series of naval historical fiction, The Journals of Matthew Quinton, has been published in the UK, North America and Germany. David is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society, and a former Chairman of the Naval Dockyards Society and Vice-President of the Society for Nautical Research.
The Anglo-Dutch Wars of the Seventeenth Century
Author: J.R. Jones
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317899474
Pages: 256
Year: 2013-11-26
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This study of the Anglo--Dutch Wars (1652-54, 1665-67, 1672-74) sets them in their naval, political and economic contexts. Competing essentially over trade, both governments were crucially influenced by mercantile interests and by the representative institutions that were central to England and the Dutch Republic. Professor Jones compares the effectiveness of the governments under pressure - English with Dutch, Commonwealth with restored monarchy, Republican with Orangist - and the effects on their economies; and examines the importance of the wars in accelerating the formation of a professional officer corps and establishing battle tactics that would endure throughout the age of sail.
The Mariner's Mirror
Author: Leonard George Carr Laughton, Roger Charles Anderson, William Gordon Perrin
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages:
Year: 2008
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Talking About Naval History
Author: John B. Hattendorf, Naval War College (U.S.). Press
Publisher: Government Printing Office
ISBN: 1884733743
Pages:
Year: 2011
View: 303
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The Warship Anne
Author: Richard Endsor
Publisher: Conway
ISBN: 1844864391
Pages: 160
Year: 2017-05-23
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If you go down to the shore at Hastings on the UK's south coast at low tide you will come upon an amazing sight. There, revealed by the receding waves are the remarkably complete mortal remains of a seventeenth century warship. The Anne was launched in 1678 and was lost in 1690 at the battle of Beachy Head. As she lay beached, she was torched to prevent her from falling into enemy hands. Today the wreck is owned by the Shipwreck Museum at Hastings and in the past few years there have been some intriguing attempts to bring the ship back to life using advanced simulation and modeling techniques. Ship's historian and draughtsman Richard Endsor has written a history of this wonderful and accessible ship, bringing the ship fully back to life using his beautiful and accurate drawings and paintings. Richard Endsor's previous book, The Restoration Warship inspired the locals at Deptford to plan a full size replica of Lenox, the warship covered in that book.
Death's Bright Angel
Author: J. D. Davies
Publisher: Canelo
ISBN: 1788631870
Pages: 300
Year: 2018-05-07
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This flaming historical adventure, book seven in the Matthew Quinton Journals, is perfect for fans of C. S. Forester London is burning, but who set the fire? In the weeks leading up to the Great Fire of 1666, Matthew Quinton, master of the H.M.S. Sceptre, is sent into the heart of London, seething with foreign plots and political paranoia, on a dangerous mission: to stop a terrorist ring from destroying the capital. Quinton is the only man that can stop these men, who want to open the country to invasion by destabilizing the English people and fueling rebellion. But unrest may not be the only thing these men will fuel... The heat is rising. With fast-paced action and fantastic historical detail, Death’s Bright Angel will appeal to fans of Angus Donald and Conn Iggulden. ‘Finely shaded characters, excellent plotting, gut-clenching action and immaculate attention to period naval detail ... these are superb books’ Angus Donald, author of The Outlaw Chronicles ‘A splendid addition to nautical adventure, and a grand story, to boot!’ Dewey Lambdin, author of the Alan Lewrie series The Matthew Quinton Journals 1. Gentleman Captain 2. The Mountain of Gold 3. The Blast that Tears the Skies 4. The Lion of Midnight 5. The Battle of the Ages 6. The Rage of Fortune 7. Death's Bright Angel 8. The Devil Upon the Wave