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z/VM and Linux on IBM System z: The Virtualization Cookbook for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.0
Author: Michael MacIsaac, Brad Hinson, IBM Redbooks
Publisher: IBM Redbooks
ISBN: 0738435104
Pages: 296
Year: 2011-02-18
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This IBM® Redbooks® publication describes how to create Linux® virtual servers in IBM z/VM® on IBM System z® hardware. This book adopts a cookbook format that provides a concise, repeatable set of procedures for installing and configuring z/VM in a logical partition (LPAR) and then installing and customizing Linux. You need an IBM System z LPAR with the associated resources, z/VM V6.1 media, and a Linux distribution. This book assumes that you have a general familiarity with System z technology and terminology. It does not assume an in-depth understanding of z/VM and Linux. It is written for those clients who want to get a quick start with z/VM and Linux on the mainframe.
Experiences with Oracle 11gR2 on Linux on System z
Author: Ivan Dobos, Sam Amsavelu, Kathryn Arrell, Gaylan Braselton, Armelle Cheve, Damian Gallagher, Hel ne Grosch, Michael MacIsaac, Romain Pochard, Barton Robinson, David Simpson, Richard Smrcina, IBM Redbooks
Publisher: IBM Redbooks
ISBN: 0738438715
Pages: 416
Year: 2013-11-22
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Linux on System z offers many advantages to customers who rely on the IBM® mainframe systems to run their businesses. Linux on System z makes use of the qualities of service in the System z® hardware and in z/VM®, making it a robust industrial strength Linux. This provides an excellent platform for hosting Oracle solutions that run in your enterprise. This IBM Redbooks® publication is divided into several sections to share the following experiences that are gained while Oracle Database 11gR2 is installed and tested: Setting up Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 for Oracle Managing an Oracle on Linux on System z environment Provisioning Linux guests using several tools It also includes many general hints and tips for running Oracle products on IBM System z with Linux and z/VM. Interested readers include database consultants, installers, administrators, and system programmers. This book is not meant to replace Oracle documentation but to supplement it with our experiences while Oracle products are installed and used.
Security for Linux on System z
Author: Lydia Parziale, Jonathan Barney, Vic Cross, William Johnston, Eduardo Kienetz, Eric Marins, Nilesh Patel, Sri Venkatesen, IBM Redbooks
Publisher: IBM Redbooks
ISBN: 0738437549
Pages: 348
Year: 2013-01-10
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No IT server platform is 100% secure and useful at the same time. If your server is installed in a secure vault, three floors underground in a double-locked room, not connected to any network and switched off, one would say it was reasonably secure, but it would be a stretch to call it useful. This IBM® Redbooks® publication is about switching on the power to your Linux® on System z® server, connecting it to the data and to the network, and letting users have access to this formidable resource space in a secure, controlled, and auditable fashion to make sure the System z server and Linux are useful to your business. As the quotation illustrates, the book is also about ensuring that, before you start designing a security solution, you understand what the solution has to achieve. The base for a secure system is tightly related to the way the architecture and virtualization has been implemented on IBM System z. Since its inception 45 years ago, the architecture has been continuously developed to meet the increasing demands for a more secure and stable platform. This book is intended for system engineers and security administrators who want to customize a Linux on System z environment to meet strict security, audit, and control regulations. For additional information, there is a tech note that describes the best practices for securing your network. It can be found at: http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/tips0981.html?Open
Practical Migration from x86 to LinuxONE
Author: Lydia Parziale, Eric R. Farman, Manoj S. Pattabhiraman, IBM Redbooks
Publisher: IBM Redbooks
ISBN: 0738442283
Pages: 216
Year: 2017-01-05
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LinuxONE is a portfolio of hardware, software, and solutions for an enterprise-grade Linux environment. It has been designed to run more transactions faster and with more security and reliability specifically for the open community. It fully embraces open source-based technology. Two servers are available for LinuxONE: The LinuxONE Emperor and Rockhopper. The IBM LinuxONE Emperor server has these features: Near limitless scaling and support of up to 8,000 virtual Linux servers on a single footprint Intrinsic platform security, and safer and faster data encryption than x86 Faster critical workloads and near real-time insights with higher performance and throughput than x86 with a net lower cost per transaction Lowered costs by managing fewer servers, reducing complexity, gaining unparalleled utilization and applying usage-based pricing The IBM LinuxONE RockhopperTM server has these features: Unprecedented performance, security, and resiliency Scale up and out with up to one million Docker containers per system Manage more transactions more quickly with 34 percent greater capacity Gain faster response times with massive high-performance I/O throughput Faster insights with large memory configurations that are optimized for Linux Delivery of data and services on the world's most secure Linux platform Aside from still running SUSE Linux Enterprise Server and Red Hat Enterprise Linux Servers, LinuxONE runs Ubuntu, which is popular on x86 hardware. Ubuntu, which runs the cloud, smartphones, a computer that can remote control a planetary rover for NASA, many market-leading companies, and the Internet of Things, is now available on IBM LinuxONE servers. Together, these two technology communities deliver the perfect environment for cloud and DevOps. Ubuntu 16.04 on LinuxONE offers developers, enterprises, and Cloud Service Providers a scalable and secure platform for next generation applications that include OpenStack, KVM, Docker, and JuJu. The following are reasons why you would want to optimize your servers through virtualization using LinuxONE: Too many distributed physical servers with low utilization A lengthy provisioning process that delays the implementation of new applications Limitations in data center power and floor space High total cost of ownership (TCO) Difficulty allocating processing power for a dynamic environment This IBM Redbooks® publication provides a technical planning reference for IT organizations that are considering a migration from their x86 distributed servers to LinuxONE. This book walks you through some of the important considerations and planning issues that you might encounter during a migration project. Within the context of a pre-existing UNIX based or x86 environment, it presents an end-to-end view of the technical challenges and methods necessary to complete a successful migration to LinuxONE.
Set Up Linux on IBM System Z for Production
Author: Lydia Parziale
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages:
Year: 2013
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Scale up for Linux on IBM Z
Author: Lydia Parziale, Edi Lopes Alves, Eric Everson Mendes Marins, IBM Redbooks
Publisher: IBM Redbooks
ISBN: 073845656X
Pages: 80
Year: 2017-12-12
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This book was written by IBM® IT specialists who have experience implementing IBM Z® solutions, especially Linux on IBM LinuxONETM (LinuxONE) or IBM Z servers. Therefore, the content of this book follows the guidelines from Linux and IBM z/VM® regarding LinuxONE and IBM Z installations. The preferred practices described in this book are gathered from the experiences of those specialists in hundreds of projects at IBM and customer environments. This publication provides you with all of the information that you need to decide the best scaling architecture when implementing Linux on IBM Z or LinuxONE. This book has the following goals: To inform you about x86 sprawl problems To inform you that x86 Vertical Scale out architectures are problematic going forward To provide solutions to x86 server sprawl problems To inform you about the LinuxONE and IBM Z differentiation for each x86 server sprawl problem To provide virtulization and security options for LinuxOne and IBM Z The scaling up and scaling out architectures enable you to scale the capacity of an existing system to attend a sporadic application demand or an application workload. This gives you some freedom to operate in the environment. However, if this activity is performed without correct planning and the correct architecture choice, it leads to a server sprawl situation where your environment houses more servers than it should based on its current and predicted requirements. Although scaling out on x86 systems is a common form of scaling because of their popularity, the x86 systems were originally designed as cheap computers. Unfortunately, the scale out on x86 can easily become a problem in terms of total cost of ownership (TCO) when the environment starts to increase in terms of number of physical servers. The LinuxONE and IBM Z servers solve the sprawl problem caused by the scaling out of x86 servers, and are an excellent choice for cloud, mobile, big data, blockchain, analytics, and other workloads that require a robust and flexible environment. This publication describes the advantages and disadvantages of the scaling options. The audience of this publication consists of the following groups: Customers, IBM Business Partners, and IBM consultants planning and installing Linux on IBM Z, IBM Z family or x86 platform System administrators administering the Linux Systems If you are a customer considering LinuxONE and IBM Z family as a platform for your applications (analytics, blockchain, cloud, or other) or a pre-sales person, read those publications.
Advanced Networking Concepts Applied Using Linux on IBM System z
Author: Lydia Parziale, Ben Louie, Eric Marins, Tiago Nunes dos Santos, Srivatsan Venkatesan, IBM Redbooks
Publisher: IBM Redbooks
ISBN: 0738436534
Pages: 144
Year: 2012-03-06
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This IBM® Redbooks® publication describes important networking concepts and industry standards that are used to support high availability on IBM System z®. Some of the networking standards described here are VLANs, VLAN trunking, link aggregation, virtual switches, VNICs, and load-balancing. We examine the various aspects of network setups and introduce the main Linux on System z networking commands and configuration files. We describe the management of network interface parameters, assignment of addresses to a network interface, and usage of the ifconfig command to configure network interfaces. We provide an overview of connectivity options available on the System z platform. We also describe high availability concepts and building a high availability solution using IBM Tivoli® System Automation. We also provide the implementation steps necessary to build a redundant network connections set up between an IBM z/VM® system and the external network switches using two Open Systems Adapter-Express 3 (OSA-Express 3) adapters with 10 Gb Ethernet ports. We describe the tests performed in our lab environment. The objectives of these tests were to gather information about performance and failover from the perspective of a real scenario, where the concepts of described in this book were applied. This book is focused on information that is practical and useful for readers with experience in network analysis and engineering networks, System z and Linux systems administrators, especially for readers that administer networks in their day-to-day activities. For additional reading: A Technote is availalble that explains changes to using channel bonding interfaces introduced with SLES 11 SP 2. It can be found at: http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/tips1000.html?Open
z/VM and Linux on IBM System z: The Virtualization Cookbook for SLES 11 SP1
Author: Michael MacIsaac, Marian Gasparovic, IBM Redbooks
Publisher: IBM Redbooks
ISBN: 0738435074
Pages: 300
Year: 2011-02-22
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This IBM® Redbooks® publication describes how to create your own Linux® virtual servers on IBM System z® hardware under z/VM®. It adopts a cookbook format that provides a concise, repeatable set of procedures for installing and configuring z/VM in an LPAR and then installing and customizing Linux. You need an IBM System z logical partition (LPAR) with associated resources, z/VM 6.1 media, and SLES 11 SP1 Linux for System z. This book assumes that you have a general familiarity with System z technology and terminology. It does not assume an in-depth understanding of z/VM and Linux. It is written for those who want to get a quick start with z/VM and Linux on the mainframe.
z/VM and Linux on IBM System z: The Virtualization Cookbook for SLES9
Author: Michael MacIsaac, Jin Xiong, IBM Redbooks
Publisher: IBM Redbooks
ISBN: 0738497363
Pages: 262
Year: 2006-04-18
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This IBM IBM Redbooks publication describes how to setup your own Linux virtual servers on IBM zSeries and System z9 under z/VM . It adopts a cookbook format that provides a clearly documented set of procedures for installing and configuring z/VM in an LPAR and then installing and customizing Linux. You need a zSeries logical partition (LPAR) with associated resources, z/VM 5.2 media, and a Linux distribution. This book is based on SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 9 (SLES9) for zSeries and we address both 31-bit and 64-bit distributions. In addition, there are a few associated REXX EXECs and Linux scripts to help speed up the process. These tools are not IBM products nor formally supported. However, they are informally supported. They are available on the Web. In this book, we assume that you have a general familiarity with zSeries technology and terminology. We do not assume an in-depth understanding of z/VM and Linux. This book is written for those who want to get a quick start with z/VM and Linux on the mainframe.
Experiences with Oracle Database 12c Release 1 on Linux on System z
Author: Arrell Kathryn, Mike Ebbers, Sam Amsavelu, Gaylan Braselton, Terry Elliott, Leon Rich, Barton Robinson, David Simpson, IBM Redbooks
Publisher: IBM Redbooks
ISBN: 073843938X
Pages: 232
Year: 2014-05-13
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Oracle Database 12c Release 1 is now supported on Linux on IBM® System z®. This platform offers many advantages to customers who rely upon the IBM mainframe systems to run their businesses. Linux on System z takes advantage of the qualities of service in the System z hardware and in IBM z/VM®, making it a robust industrial strength version of Linux. This provides an excellent platform for hosting Oracle solutions that run in an enterprise. This IBM Redbooks® publication shares experiences that are gained while installing and testing Oracle Database 12c Release 1: Recommendations about how to set up an infrastructure Installing an Oracle Grid Infrastructure Installing Oracle 12C R1 Real Application Clusters (RAC) and creating a RAC Database, including a multitenant database Using the Cloud Control Agent to manage Oracle Database 12c Release 1 Installing Oracle WebLogic Server 12c Upgrading from an Oracle Database from 11gR2 to 12c Release 1 The audience for this publication includes database consultants, installers, administrators, and system programmers. This publication is not meant to replace Oracle documentation, but to supplement it with our experiences while installing and using Oracle products.
Linux on IBM System Z
Author: IBM Redbooks
Publisher:
ISBN: 0738436321
Pages:
Year: 2011-12-27
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z/VM and Linux Operations for z/OS System Programmers
Author: Lydia Parziale, Omar Badreddin, Roy P Costa, Rodrigo Ceron Ferreira de Castro, Marian Gasparovic, Kenneth P Haas, Guillaume Lasmayous, Raymond Van Deurs, IBM Redbooks
Publisher: IBM Redbooks
ISBN: 0738431591
Pages: 438
Year: 2008-10-28
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This IBM Redbooks publication discusses z/VM and Linux operations from the perspective of the z/OS programmer or system programmer. Although other books have been written about many of these topics, this book gives enough information about each topic to describe z/VM and Linux on IBM System z operations to somebody who is new to both environments. This book is intended for z/OS programmers and system programmers who are transitioning to the z/VM and Linux on System z environments and who want a translation guide for assistance. We base this book on our experiences using System z10 Enterprise Edition, z/VM version 5.3 RSU 0701, and Novell SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) 10 on System z.
Set up Linux on IBM System z for Production
Author: Lydia Parziale, Saulo Silva, David Borges De Sousa, Livio Sousa, Junius Mills, Qi Ye, IBM Redbooks
Publisher: IBM Redbooks
ISBN: 0738438871
Pages: 190
Year: 2013-11-25
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This IBM® Redbooks® publication shows the power of IBM System z® virtualization and flexibility in sharing resources in a flexible production environment. In this book, we outline the planning and setup of Linux on System z to move from a development or test environment into production. As an example, we use one logical partition (LPAR) with shared CPUs with memory for a production environment and another LPAR that shares some CPUs, but also has a dedicated one for production. Running in IBM z/VM® mode allows for virtualization of servers and based on z/VM shares, can prioritize and control their resources. The size of the LPAR or z/VM resources depends on the workload and the applications that run that workload. We examine a typical web server environment, Java applications, and describe it by using a database management system, such as IBM DB2®. Network decisions are examined with regards to VSWITCH, shared Open Systems Adapter (OSA), IBM HiperSocketsTM and the HiperPAV, or FCP/SCSI attachment used with a storage area network (SAN) Volume Controller along with performance and throughput expectations. The intended audience for this IBM Redbooks publication is IT architects who are responsible for planning production environments and IT specialists who are responsible for implementation of production environments.
z/VSE Using DB2 on Linux for System z
Author: Helmut Hellner, Ingo Franzki, Martin Kammerer, Roopa Mahendra, Wilhelm Mild, IBM Redbooks
Publisher: IBM Redbooks
ISBN: 0738434000
Pages: 216
Year: 2010-02-03
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Data is one the most critical and valuable assets of a business. Critical strategic decisions can be made more quickly and effectively when they are based on complete, accurate, and timely operational data. From this point of view, it is important to have an enterprise data management architecture that supports a flexible global view of the business. Many environments today are heterogeneous with a high quantity and diversity of data. In this IBM® Redbooks® publication, we help enterprise architects and IT managers with these environments make decisions for a centralized database or data warehouse. We recommend a centralized data management environment on Linux® on System z®. We include guidance for IBM z/VSETM and Linux specialists to reorganize existing IBM DB2® VSE data and build a database environment with continuous operation in Linux on System z. We begin this book by describing the possibilities and advantages of enterprise data management and different technical ways to realize it. Then we discuss planning, which is important for setting the foundation of the architecture that is implemented. We explain the hardware considerations for capacity and performance planning. For the z/VSE system and Linux on System z, we describe considerations for operation in a logical partition (LPAR) and in a virtualized environment with IBM z/VM®. In addition, we discuss the disk behavior for different workloads, storage dependencies, network connections, and DB2 database considerations. We also guide you in customizing the DB2 server for z/VSE, z/VM, and DB2 on Linux to allow existing z/VSE and z/VM applications to access the database on Linux on System z. We include the data migration, application considerations, dependencies, compatibility, monitoring, and tuning possibilities in such an environment.
The Virtualization Cookbook for IBM z Systems Volume 1: IBM z/VM 6.3
Author: Lydia Parziale, Berthold Gunreben, Felipe Miranda, Paul W Novak, Ken Werner, IBM Redbooks
Publisher: IBM Redbooks
ISBN: 0738440868
Pages: 368
Year: 2016-06-27
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This IBM® Redbooks® publication is the first volume of a series of three books called The Virtualization Cookbook for IBM z Systems. The other two volumes relate to Red Hat and SUSE: The Virtualization Cookbook for IBM z Systems Volume 2: Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server 7.1, SG24-8303 The Virtualization Cookbook for IBM z Systems Volume 3: SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12, SG24-8890 It is recommended that you start with Volume 1 of this series because IBM z/VM® is the base "layer" when you install Linux on z Systems. Volume 1 starts with an introduction, discusses planning, then describes z/VM installation into a two-node single system image (SSI) cluster, configuration, hardening, automation, and servicing. It adopts a cookbook format that provides a concise, repeatable set of procedures for installing and configuring z/VM by using the z/VM SSI clustering feature. Volume 1 consists of the following chapters: Chapter 1, "Introduction to Linux on the IBM mainframe under z/VM" on page 3. This chapter provides a concise introduction to the concept of using the z/VM platform as an enterprise Linux infrastructure on the IBM mainframe. Chapter 2, "Planning" on page 15. This chapter covers the planning of hardware, software, and networking resources that you need to do before you attempt to install z/VM and Linux. Chapter 3, "Configuring a workstation for mainframe access" on page 39. This chapter addresses the configuration of a workstation that is running either Linux or Windows to access the mainframe. Chapter 4, "Installing and configuring z/VM" on page 49. This chapter describes installing z/VM 6.3 as a two-node VM Single System Image feature (VMSSI) cluster, performing the initial configuration, hardening, and enabling basic system automation. Chapter 5, "Servicing z/VM" on page 153. This chapter focuses on the requirements to keep your z/VM systems updated to ensure full functionality, optimal utility, security, and the elimination of known problems. The process of ordering and applying z/VM Service is described. Programming Temporary Fixes (PTFs) and Recommended Service Upgrades (RSUs) are both covered. Chapter 6, "Planning and preparing for Linux workloads" on page 171. This chapter describes the necessary steps to begin your first Linux installation. It describes common tasks that are executed during administration, maintenance, and expansion to accommodate additional workloads. Volumes 2 and 3 describe how to Linux virtual servers on IBM z SystemsTM hardware under IBM z/VM. The cookbook format continues with installing and customizing Linux. For Volume 1, you need at least two IBM z Systems logical partitions (LPARs) with associated resources and z/VM 6.3 installation media. For Volumes 2 and 3, you will need either the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server (RHEL) version 7.1 or the SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) version 12 distribution (or both). This book series assumes that you are generally familiar with z Systems technology and terminology. It does not assume an in-depth understanding of z/VM or Linux. It is written for those individuals who want to start quickly with z/VM and Linux on the mainframe, and get virtual servers up and running in a short time (days, not weeks or months).