San Antonio V Rodriguez and the Pursuit of Equal Education

Author: Paul A. Sracic
Publisher:
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Kindle
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An in-depth study of school financing examined through the closely decided Supreme Court case that overturned a ruling that found Texas's system for financing its public schools was unconstitutional, signaling the end of an era in the pursuit of equal education for all American citizens.

The Enduring Legacy of Rodriguez

Author: Charles J. Ogletree, Jr.
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781612508313
Format: PDF, ePub
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In "The Enduring Legacy of "Rodriguez, leading legal and educational scholars examine "San Antonio Independent School District v. Rodriguez "(1973), the landmark US Supreme Court decision that held that the Constitution does not guarantee equality of educational opportunity. This ambitious volume assesses the history of the decision and presents a variety of creative strategies to address the pernicious effects of inequality on student learning and achievement. Ogletree, Robinson, and their expert cowriters offer hope that this decision can be reversed or that other ways can be found to counter its ill effects. This book is a thoughtful and overdue contribution to improving schools. Jack Jennings, author, "Presidents, Congress, and the Public Schools" There is an enduring tradition in this nation of relentless legal scholars who stand as champions for educational equity. This important volume follows in that tradition, deftly charting the future of educational opportunity. Ronald F. Ferguson, faculty cochair and director, The Achievement Gap Initiative, Harvard University Ogletree and Robinson remind us that equalizing educational opportunity in the United States is going to require fundamental changes in law and policy from many directions, from how we allocate our financial resources to rethinking our housing policies. Their book makes a very important contribution toward broadening the conversation we re having around reforming education. Wendy Kopp, cofounder and CEO, Teach For All The Supreme Court s effective abdication of any role in securing equal educational opportunity requires us to continue to grapple with the past, present, and future effects of the "Rodriguez" decision, and the essays here make essential contributions to that endeavor. Thomas A. Saenz, president and general counsel, Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund Charles J. Ogletree, Jr., is the Jesse Climenko Professor of Law and founding and executive director of the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice at Harvard Law School. Kimberly Jenkins Robinson is a professor at the University of Richmond School of Law and a researcher at the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice. James E. Ryan is the dean and Charles William Eliot Professor of Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education."

A Black and White Case

Author: Greg Stohr
Publisher: Bloomberg Press
ISBN: 9781417553440
Format: PDF, ePub
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Stohr's compelling narrative unveils the drama behind the controversial affirmative action lawsuits and sheds new light during the election season on the White House's role in the Supreme Court's decision.

Fighting Their Own Battles

Author: Brian D. Behnken
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807834785
Format: PDF, Docs
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Between 1940 and 1975, African Americans and Mexican Americans in Texas fought a number of battles in court, at the ballot box, in schools, and on the streets to eliminate segregation and state-imposed racism. Although both groups engaged in civil rights

Brown v Board of Education

Author: James T. Patterson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199880840
Format: PDF, ePub
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2004 marks the fiftieth anniversary of the Supreme Court's unanimous decision to end segregation in public schools. Many people were elated when Supreme Court Chief Justice Earl Warren delivered Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka in May 1954, the ruling that struck down state-sponsored racial segregation in America's public schools. Thurgood Marshall, chief attorney for the black families that launched the litigation, exclaimed later, "I was so happy, I was numb." The novelist Ralph Ellison wrote, "another battle of the Civil War has been won. The rest is up to us and I'm very glad. What a wonderful world of possibilities are unfolded for the children!" Here, in a concise, moving narrative, Bancroft Prize-winning historian James T. Patterson takes readers through the dramatic case and its fifty-year aftermath. A wide range of characters animates the story, from the little-known African Americans who dared to challenge Jim Crow with lawsuits (at great personal cost); to Thurgood Marshall, who later became a Justice himself; to Earl Warren, who shepherded a fractured Court to a unanimous decision. Others include segregationist politicians like Governor Orval Faubus of Arkansas; Presidents Eisenhower, Johnson, and Nixon; and controversial Supreme Court justices such as William Rehnquist and Clarence Thomas. Most Americans still see Brown as a triumph--but was it? Patterson shrewdly explores the provocative questions that still swirl around the case. Could the Court--or President Eisenhower--have done more to ensure compliance with Brown? Did the decision touch off the modern civil rights movement? How useful are court-ordered busing and affirmative action against racial segregation? To what extent has racial mixing affected the academic achievement of black children? Where indeed do we go from here to realize the expectations of Marshall, Ellison, and others in 1954?

The Constrained Court

Author: Michael A. Bailey
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400840260
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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How do Supreme Court justices decide their cases? Do they follow their policy preferences? Or are they constrained by the law and by other political actors? The Constrained Court combines new theoretical insights and extensive data analysis to show that law and politics together shape the behavior of justices on the Supreme Court. Michael Bailey and Forrest Maltzman show how two types of constraints have influenced the decision making of the modern Court. First, Bailey and Maltzman document that important legal doctrines, such as respect for precedents, have influenced every justice since 1950. The authors find considerable variation in how these doctrines affect each justice, variation due in part to the differing experiences justices have brought to the bench. Second, Bailey and Maltzman show that justices are constrained by political factors. Justices are not isolated from what happens in the legislative and executive branches, and instead respond in predictable ways to changes in the preferences of Congress and the president. The Constrained Court shatters the myth that justices are unconstrained actors who pursue their personal policy preferences at all costs. By showing how law and politics interact in the construction of American law, this book sheds new light on the unique role that the Supreme Court plays in the constitutional order.

The Challenge to Care in Schools 2nd Editon

Author: Nel Noddings
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 080777314X
Format: PDF, Docs
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After a decade of educational reforms, The Challenge to Care in Schools is even more relevant now than when it was first published. In her new Introduction, Nel Noddings revisits her seminal book and places care as central to current debates on standardization, accountability, privatization, and the continuous struggle between traditional and progressive methods of education. Rather then forcing one side to yield to the other, this book advocates an alternative, “responsive system” that will allow the best ideas to flourish. In the Second Edition, Noddings once again envisions a school system built on the idea that different people have different strengths, and that these strengths should be cultivated in an environment of caring, not of competition. She suggests that if we make the responsiveness characteristic of caring more basic than accountability, we can accommodate both traditional and progressive preferences in one school system to the benefit of all . . . especially the children. Chapters address the practical and theoretical questions involved in organizing traditional and nontraditional areas of study around themes of care. Introductory chapters focus on caring in general and on the problems of liberal education, while the final chapter offers sound advice for implementing a caring curriculum in our schools. Praise for the First Edition! "A welcome addition to the often fragmented discussion of what children need and what school and education should be." —Harvard Educational Review "I recommend this book to all concerned about education, personally and/or professionally." —Journal of Moral Education "In the morass of school reform that calls for such changes as national standards, improved assessments, and new ways of organizing schooling, Noddings provides lucid thinking about the priorities we ought to consider." —Teachers College Record

Deciding What to Teach and Test

Author: Fenwick W. English
Publisher: Corwin Press
ISBN: 1412960134
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Focusing on curriculum leadership and closing the achievement gap, this influential book is updated with new insights on developing and aligning curriculum in a standards-based environment.

Disruption by Design

Author: Paul Paetz
Publisher: Apress
ISBN: 1430246332
Format: PDF, ePub
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From Eli Whitney to Henry Ford to Ray Kroc to Steve Jobs, market disruptors have reaped the benefits, including fame and fortune. But do you have to be that rare genius whose unique skills can literally change the world? No. Disrupting a market is a discipline that can be learned. Disruption by Design—a handbook for entrepreneurs, CEOs, product developers, innovators, and others who want to build products or create services that systematically disrupt markets—is the first book that shows you how. There is a huge difference between being an "innovator" and being a "disruptive innovator." Disruptors change the basis for competition in markets, and they end up controlling market share—typically 40 to 80% of the total revenue and half or more of the total profits in the categories they create. But while many market opportunities have disruptive potential, only a small fraction of those ever succeed in disrupting markets. And, too often, those that do disrupt do so by accident. It doesn’t have to be that way. Disruption by Design conveys lessons learned from successful disruptors, and from the many companies that should have disrupted but failed. Beginning with a quick review of the theory and key elements of the patterns of disruptive innovations and how to identify ideas with disruptive potential, Disruption by Design guides you through the design, build, and go-to-market phases that successful disruptors follow. Using many examples of disruptive companies and products, this book takes the popular theory of disruptive innovation and drives it down to the level of practical application. It answers the question, "How do I create a disruptive company, product, and culture?" Disruption by Design:“ul> Goes beyond describing how disruptive innovation happens, and answers and explains the all-important "why." Provides a "where-to-look" guide for discovering disruptive opportunities. Shows you how to predict when market disruption is likely. Outlines the necessary ingredients and elements of corporate strategy that maximize the probability of being disruptive. Provides a roadmap to disruptive success, from the initial idea through product launch to actual market disruption. Shows how to stay atop the market and not be the next victim of a new disruptor. Includes the Disruption by Design Canvas, for mapping a disruptive business model. Most important, Disruption by Design articulates a step-by-step process for developing a product and marketing strategy—and a business model design—that maximizes the probability of successful market disruption.

From the Barrio to Washington

Author: Armando Rodriguez
Publisher: UNM Press
ISBN: 9780826343819
Format: PDF
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What would be the odds of a poor Mexican boy who migrated with his family to southern California in the 1920s rising through the ranks of the American education system to become the first Hispanic principal of a junior and senior high school in San Diego, the second Hispanic to be a college president in California, and to serve in the administrations of four U.S. presidents? Armando Rodriguez spoke no English when he first set foot in the United States and was just old enough to start school in a district with few Spanish-speaking teachers. But with parents who emphasized the importance of education and who taught him the value of hard work, Armando Rodriguez became fluent in English, received a doctorate in bilingual education, and was instrumental in developing the field of bilingual education while serving as Assistant Commissioner of Education for the nation. Rodriguez recalls his inspirational journey from a short child who was so dark he was nicknamed "Shadow" to being influential in shaping education on district, state, and national levels. Some still call him Shadow, though it is now spoken with respect and admiration for an immigrant who overcame many obstacles to become an instrument of change for his country. "Armando Rodriguez offers the gift of his fascinating life in this timely and candid autobiography of a poor immigrant child who arrived speaking no English and climbed the entire staircase of the American dream to power in Washington."--Eleanor Holmes Norton