New Science New World

Author: Denise Albanese
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822317685
Format: PDF, ePub
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In New Science, New World Denise Albanese examines the discursive interconnections between two practices that emerged in the seventeenth century--modern science and colonialism. Drawing on the discourse analysis of Foucault, the ideology-critique of Marxist cultural studies, and de Certeau's assertion that the modern world produces itself through alterity, she argues that the beginnings of colonialism are intertwined in complex fashion with the ways in which the literary became the exotic "other" and undervalued opposite of the scientific. Albanese reads the inaugurators of the scientific revolution against the canonical authors of early modern literature, discussing Galileo's Dialogue on the Two Chief World Systems and Bacon's New Atlantis as well as Milton's Paradise Lost and Shakespeare's The Tempest. She examines how the newness or "novelty" of investigating nature is expressed through representations of the New World, including the native, the feminine, the body, and the heavens. "New" is therefore shown to be a double sign, referring both to the excitement associated with a knowledge oriented away from past practices, and to the oppression and domination typical of the colonialist enterprise. Exploring the connections between the New World and the New Science, and the simultaneously emerging patterns of thought and forms of writing characteristic of modernity, Albanese insists that science is at its inception a form of power-knowledge, and that the modern and postmodern division of "Two Cultures," the literary and the scientific, has its antecedents in the early modern world. New Science, New World makes an important contribution to feminist, new historicist, and cultural materialist debates about the extent to which the culture of seventeenth-century England is proto-modern. It will offer scholars and students from a wide range of fields a new critical model for historical practice.

Measuring the New World

Author: Neil Safier
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226733562
Format: PDF, Docs
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Prior to 1735, South America was terra incognita to many Europeans. But that year, the Paris Academy of Sciences sent a mission to the Spanish American province of Quito (in present-day Ecuador) to study the curvature of the earth at the Equator. Equipped with quadrants and telescopes, the mission’s participants referred to the transfer of scientific knowledge from Europe to the Andes as a “sacred fire” passing mysteriously through European astronomical instruments to observers in South America. By taking an innovative interdisciplinary look at the traces of this expedition, Measuring the New World examines the transatlantic flow of knowledge from West to East. Through ephemeral monuments and geographical maps, this book explores how the social and cultural worlds of South America contributed to the production of European scientific knowledge during the Enlightenment. Neil Safier uses the notebooks of traveling philosophers, as well as specimens from the expedition, to place this particular scientific endeavor in the larger context of early modern print culture and the emerging intellectual category of scientist as author.

Secret Science

Author: María M. Portuondo
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226675378
Format: PDF, Docs
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The discovery of the New World raised many questions for early modern scientists: What did these lands contain? Where did they lie in relation to Europe? Who lived there, and what were their inhabitants like? Imperial expansion necessitated changes in the way scientific knowledge was gathered, and Spanish cosmographers in particular were charged with turning their observations of the New World into a body of knowledge that could be used for governing the largest empire the world had ever known. As María M. Portuondo here shows, this cosmographic knowledge had considerable strategic, defensive, and monetary value that royal scientists were charged with safeguarding from foreign and internal enemies. Cosmography was thus a secret science, but despite the limited dissemination of this body of knowledge, royal cosmographers applied alternative epistemologies and new methodologies that changed the discipline, and, in the process, how Europeans understood the natural world.

Webster s New World Dictionary of Science

Author: David Lindley
Publisher: Webster's New World
ISBN: 9780028623825
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Defines over seven thousands terms and concepts in the sciences, from acoustics, anthropology, and astronomy, to mathematics, metallurgy, and meteorology, to tectonics, topology, and zoology

Genetic engineering dream or nightmare

Author: Mae-Wan Ho
Publisher: Salamander Books (PA)
ISBN: 9781858600512
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The five facets of GENETIC ENGINEERING: DREAM OR NIGHTMARE include: a simple guide to genetics, its history, principles of biotechnology, how it developed, and how the Third World is being affected by biotech strategies of the West. Dr. Ho warns of the likelihood of genetic catastrophes affecting food and health.